Artichoke Tapenade

Tapenade gets its name from tapeno, the word for “capers” in the Provencal language. This recipe comes from David Lebovitz who insists vehemently that authentic tapenade must have capers in it. Period. Mashed olives alone can’t quite do it. I agree, wholeheartedly. A stickler like me would have no issue with his approach. Calling a spade, a spade. Maybe one day, I’ll wake up and decide to be a rebel, turn everything upside down, and take capers out of tapenade. But not today.

It’s funny the way David gets into the stories about life and culture in Paris. In My Paris Kitchen (which the CookthebookFridays group is cooking with recipe by recipe) he wrote: “He (Jacques, the olive guy) complained so much that I nicknamed him the râleur. Complaining isn’t considered a fault in France, but a normal reaction to life, where the odds always seem to be stacked against you.” No complaints from me, not about the tapenade, or life in general, especially when spring is in the air. Today is a special day.

I followed the recipe using canned artichoke hearts, pitted green olives, olive oil, capers, fresh squeezed lemon juice, minced garlic and some cayenne pepper. Pureed all the ingredients in a handheld blender until smooth. Seasoned with some salt. I skipped the rosemary oil entirely, and added a dash of fresh pomegranate seeds. Pomegrante seeds add color, texture, contrast and sweetness to the tapenade, just the way I like it. I served it with some homemade crusty bread or naan. The rest went into the fridge. By the way the tapenade tastes, I think it’ll be gone in no time!

Happy April fool’s day!

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22 Comments

  • Reply
    Mardi Michels
    April 1, 2016 at 10:16 am

    This is so pretty with the pomegranate arils on top!

  • Reply
    flour.ish.en
    April 1, 2016 at 1:57 pm

    Pomegranates in the tapenade look like blossoming flowers that make an impressive visual appeal, if not anything else.

  • Reply
    Emily
    April 1, 2016 at 3:16 pm

    Yes, I enjoyed reading David's story on Jacques too! Love the pop of ruby garnishes on your tapenade. Love spring pictures.

  • Reply
    flour.ish.en
    April 1, 2016 at 3:36 pm

    It was enjoyable reading and making this tapendade.

  • Reply
    oneexpatslife.com
    April 1, 2016 at 7:02 pm

    No complaints from me today either. How very un-french;-)

  • Reply
    aplatefulofhappiness.com
    April 2, 2016 at 2:11 am

    David's stories are amusing. I loved how easy this one was. I like your colorful garnish!

  • Reply
    kitchen flavours
    April 2, 2016 at 6:50 am

    David is a wonderful writer!
    Adding pomegranate seeds to the tapenade is a wonderful idea! The added crunch and sweetness must have complement the slightly sourish tapenade really well!

  • Reply
    Teresa
    April 2, 2016 at 7:32 am

    I love the stories threaded through David's book – they make it all the more enjoyable to cook from it. Your pomegranate variation on this dip sounds wonderful (and looks beautiful).

  • Reply
    KB from Prof Who Cooks
    April 2, 2016 at 1:19 pm

    Gorgeous with the pomegranates and I love the visual connections between the photo of the tapenade and the photo of the cherry blossoms. Beautiful post!

  • Reply
    Kathy
    April 2, 2016 at 1:30 pm

    Yours looks so appetizing. Love the addition of the pomegranate seeds. Lovely!

  • Reply
    Natascha Beutner
    April 3, 2016 at 7:56 am

    Wow! Looks fabulous!

  • Reply
    Natascha Beutner
    April 3, 2016 at 7:57 am

    Wow! Looks fabulous!

  • Reply
    Nicole
    April 3, 2016 at 11:54 am

    I agree that the stories in the book are so entertaining! Your tapenade looks great… I would have eaten this with or without the infused oil.

  • Reply
    Nicole
    April 3, 2016 at 11:54 am

    I agree that the stories in the book are so entertaining! Your tapenade looks great… I would have eaten this with or without the infused oil.

  • Reply
    cookandfarmer.co
    April 4, 2016 at 1:24 am

    beautiful blooms and pomegranate seeds!

  • Reply
    dishnthekitchen
    April 4, 2016 at 4:18 pm

    Great idea adding the extra acidity with the pomegranate arils…and I agree with you and David, there MUST be capers in my tapenade. Ah complaining..it's one of my favourite past times. Yet another reason I must belong in France 🙂

  • Reply
    flour.ish.en
    April 4, 2016 at 6:10 pm

    I certainly have my fair share of complaining.

  • Reply
    Renee Iseson
    April 4, 2016 at 9:16 pm

    Love that you added pomegranate arils. What a great idea!

  • Reply
    Mary Hirsch
    April 7, 2016 at 1:28 am

    This was a difficult recipe to photograph and by your adding the fresh pomegranate seeds, you "prettied it up" to something even more special. As for me, I never ever complain. (Am pretending it's still April Fool's Day)

  • Reply
    flour.ish.en
    April 7, 2016 at 3:28 am

    My true motivation for adding pomegranate seeds was that the pomegranate has been sitting in my fridge for way too long.

  • Reply
    Adriana
    April 10, 2016 at 12:20 am

    An ice cream parlor made an April Fools prank on their Instagram feed announcing their new iguana flavor. As April Fools food pranks go, a few pomegranate seeds are just the right amount of whimsical.

  • Reply
    sanyaliving.com
    April 10, 2016 at 11:29 am

    I loved this tapenade and yours looks great with the pomegranate seeds!
    The spring bloom is so pretty, we are just starting autumn in Australia and I'm late to this post due to a virus!
    But so glad I made it, it was so easy and so packed with flavour!

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